Rice Lake Trading Post and Indian Mound Builders


COPYRIGHT (c) 2014 Michael Stephenson

No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted by any means including photocopying or electronic transfers, without written permission.


AN OLD TRADING POST

LOCATED ON THE SHORES OF RICE LAKE

The Discoveries of Mr. David Boyle Becoming Historical – More Earth Mounds Found – A Valuable Shell Ornament

That portion of Otonabee township bordering on Rice Lake and the mouth of the Otonabee River, through the recent discoveries of Mr. David Boyle, curator of the archaeological museum, Toronto, has proved to have been the home of the mound builders in Ontario.

Last week - a week ago today – the discovery of a serpent and egg mound, on Roche’s Point, two miles from Keene, was announced and since that time Mr. Boyle has been engaged examining other portions of the land adjacent to the lake and river and has made some interesting discoveries.

After becoming thoroughly familiar with the serpent mound, he inspected other spots, and in his examinations located a mound on the bluff forming, what is known as Cameron’s Point, on Rice Lake, and on opening the artificial formation he found evidences of bodies having been buried there. For several days he has been engaged on Mr. Alex Spear’s farm, a mile and half from the Indian reservation of Hiawatha. That the Indians of centuries past made the shores of Rice Lake one of their centres is certain, and becomes more so when members of the once powerful tribes have resided here for years, Hiawatha is

AN INDIAN SETTLEMENT,

The dark-faced brethren engaging in farming principally on a reserve set a part by the Government. The farm which Mr. spears occupies is at the mouth of the river, west of Hatrick’s Point, the popular summer resort on the Otonabee. The farm is of an historical nature. It was originally the property of an old British officer, Capt. Anderson, or Major Anderson, who was given a grant of 2,000 acres by the British Government. Very few of the residents of the locality are aware that on the east end of the farm, within a few feet of the lake can be discerned the ruins of an old Northwest trading post. In fact, only one person, Squire Thompson, could be found who could recollect the time when the walls of the house were standing. It was known as the old Bay House and was used for traders coming from the Huron country, now the populous counties surrounding the Georgian Bay, to dispose of their furs at Montreal. The post was possibly more of a resting place where sleep and fresh stock and provisions could be obtained than a trading post, Mr. Boyle learned from Mr. Thompson that the building, which was built of logs, faced the east and west and the chimney stood at the east side, where the only remains, likely those of the fireplace, can be seen. The dimensions of the structure were probably 20 by 24 feet. It is some 25 years since the walls were last seen standing. The post was situated close to a good landing place directly opposite Spook Island.

On this farm, which is also known as the Miller farm, Mr. Boyle made several discoveries. East of Mr. Spears residence and 80 feet above the level of the lake, a

MOUND WAS OPENED

And three skeletons were brought out. They were the largest Mr. Boyle had ever seen and he succeeded in securing five bones. The skulls were not in good condition. In his examination Mr. Boyle also found a knife or arrow, two sharp pointed tools made of deer’s horns. Another mound north of the house had been dug into by a man who wanted to build a root house, and he found two skeletons. This mound was larger than the other one, being about five feet high. Yesterday Mr. Boyle and his men were opening a mound in a field below the house and nearer to the river. Squire Thompson says it was originally six feet high, but it had been ploughed down and the width increased contrary to the statement of the Kentucky man who claimed a mound had been twice as high and twice as wide before it was ploughed. At present this mound is 34 x 44 and 3 feet above the level. In this formation was found one of the rarest and most valuable European shell ornaments. It was made of shell, known as the Busycon, from the Gulf of Mexico and was intended to represent a turtle. A few bone instruments, harpoons – one with six barbs and another with one barb – half of a stone tablet, and two stone axes were also found. The mound itself is composed of earth of various colours – red, white, black, brown and yellow. The white seems chiefly of lime as if bodies or shells had been

BURIED THERE AND DECAYED

The red seems to be half burnt sandy clay. The greatest depth reached at this spot was five feet. The field, in which the mound was situated, looks as if it was an old village or camping site, as the land is burnt to a great extent. Mr. Boyle finds a noticeable absence of pipes in this locality and evidently these Indians were not a smoking race. At Nottowassagga, in the country of Simcoe, more pipes than anything else were found. Mr. Boyle procured an unfinished stone pipe from a Hiawatha Indian and a soapstone pipe for Mr. J. McIntyre. The former was similar to those found in the mounds of Ohio.

Mr. Boyle went to Toronto this morning, but will return and spend some time in Otonabee.


E-mail comments to:


Ontario Genealogy County Directories - Subscriber Site

Ontario Genealogy Historical Newspaper Site - Subscriber Site

Ontario Genealogy - Historical Images of the Past - Subscriber Site

Ontario Genealogy - Historical Atlas Maps - Subscriber Site

Ontario Genealogy - Historical Visits to Ontario Villages and Towns - Subscriber Site


Subscribe here:

Ontario Genealogy Subscription Form


1921 Canada Census Explanation and Information


  Upper Canada (Ontario) Marriage Database  Updated May 28, 2013

  Upper Canada (Ontario) Baptism Database  Updated February 26, 2013

  Upper Canada (Ontario) Burial Database

Upper Canada (Ontario) Newspaper Notices Database Updated January 29, 2012


Ontario (Upper Canada) History and Pioneer Family Research Created April 1, 2011

Queen's Own Rifles - Old Photos of Members Created April 8, 2011

Upper Canada District Maps (Circa 1800) Created April 26, 2011

Upper Canada (Ontario) History Books On-Line Index


Upper Canada Land Petitions 51000 Records Indexed

Upper Canada Land Leases and Miscellaneous Petitions 10000 Records Indexed

Upper Canada (Ontario) Sundries Database 

Ontario - Upper Canada Land Registry Records


Upper Canada (Ontario) Toronto Insane Asylum Database

Upper Canada (Ontario) Kingston Insane Asylum Database

Upper Canada (Ontario) London Insane Asylum Database

Upper Canada (Ontario) Malden Insane Asylum Database

Upper Canada (Ontario) Hamilton Insane Asylum Database


Ontario Genealogy Historical Newspaper Collection  Historical Newspaper Files from various regions of Ontario 

NEWSPAPER Genealogical and Historical Records - Thousands of entries


Ontario (Upper Canada) Map Collection  Great site for locating your ancestors in Ontario

Ontario Genealogy Postcard Site - Great old-time landscape views


Upper Canada and Ontario CRIMINAL Database 


Ontario Genealogy Database Index Site 400 000 Genealogy Records Indexed


 Join the Ontario Genealogy mail list now. Discussion group for genealogy and history of the Province of Ontario post 1867, or join the Upper Canada (Ontario) mail list now, discussion group for genealogy and history of Upper Canada prior to 1867.

Subscribe: Type subscribe in message subject and body.

Ontario Genealogy Mail List

Upper Canada Genealogy Mail List


Need HELP With Your Family Research?...


Northumberland County Genealogy and History

Victoria County Genealogy and History

Durham County Genealogy and History

Haliburton County Genealogy and History

Peterborough County History and Genealogy

Newcastle District (Upper Canada) History and Genealogy

Ontario County History and Genealogy

Upper Canada History and Genealogy

Echoes of the Past - Ontario Genealogy Home


Search the Ontario Genealogy Website

Only search the Ontario Genealogy Site


Email: